the forums at degreez.net

It is currently Sat Oct 21, 2017 6:58 pm

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]




Forum locked This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 24 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
 Post subject: how-to
PostPosted: Thu Sep 09, 2004 9:43 pm 
go to http://www.portforward.com/routers.htm and pick the router/modem you have. detailed step-by-step, this site set me straight (kinda)


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Sep 12, 2004 6:00 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Sep 12, 2004 10:28 am
Posts: 12
Can anyone put a guide to Static IP for Netgear MR814v2 it ried portforward and i tested it it said it was closed o_o


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 20, 2004 11:22 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2004 9:12 pm
Posts: 7
Location: Canada
Portforward is out of date when it comes to the new WRT54G firmware. Here's an updated walkthrough for Firware v3 With windows XP sp2. (By the way, I suggest updating your router firmware, even though Linksys doesn't recommend it unless you're having problems. I just love new features :D )

First: Set up your router and internet connection as usual. If you're having problems with this step, you need to stop and go read your router's guide.

Second: Go to Start->Run and type cmd. this will bring up the command prompt console.

Third: Type "ipconfig/all" in the command prompt, and hit enter. This is the info you'll need to set up a static IP address. If you don't see any DNS servers listed, you'll just need to look for them on your router page. Again, if you're having troubles doing something like this, getting BT to work better should be somewhat of a secondary concern. Click on the Status link on the top bar on the router page, and then scroll down to the DNS addresses. Write them down and move on to the next step.

Fourth: Open up your router page (if it isn't already). On your router's setup page under the Basic Setup screen look for the section called Internet Setup. From here you need to

a) Change the connection type to a static IP, then

b) scroll down and find the Network AddressServer Settings
under the network settings heading. Click the disable button beside DHCP.

c) Scroll down and click save, and then continue.

Fifth: Now you should be back to the Setup-Basic Setup page, and your changes should have taken effect. At this point you want to get to the properties window for your connection. There are several ways to do this, so if you're one of the people who know them, feel special. For those of you who are still getting over the fact that a mouse isn't just a furry rodent,

a)click on Start->Control Panel->Network Connections. Then

b)click on either Local Area Connection (if you’re the router) or Wireless Network Connection (if you're the wireless).

c)Click on the Properties button on the screen that comes up. This will bring up another screen. Here

d) click on Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and click on the Properties button.

e)Click the buttons for "Use the following IP address" and "Use the following DNS server addresses" then enter the info from the cmd window into the appropriate places.

f)I don't know how much of a difference having a third DNS address makes, but if you want it for whatever reason, after you've entered in the other two DNS addresses click the Advanced button, then the DNS tab, and click the add button. Enter your address, and click ok/apply on all the windows that've come up since step d). When you get to the window that has the properties for your connection, click Close -not- Cancel. It'll take a second for all the settings to take effect, so sit tight. Eventually the window will close, and you're done. Cheers!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Dec 31, 2004 8:55 pm 
Chim wrote:
Portforward is out of date when it comes to the new WRT54G firmware. Here's an updated walkthrough for Firware v3 With windows XP sp2. (By the way, I suggest updating your router firmware, even though Linksys doesn't recommend it unless you're having problems. I just love new features :D )

First: Set up your router and internet connection as usual. If you're having problems with this step, you need to stop and go read your router's guide.

Second: Go to Start->Run and type cmd. this will bring up the command prompt console.

Third: Type "ipconfig/all" in the command prompt, and hit enter. This is the info you'll need to set up a static IP address. If you don't see any DNS servers listed, you'll just need to look for them on your router page. Again, if you're having troubles doing something like this, getting BT to work better should be somewhat of a secondary concern. Click on the Status link on the top bar on the router page, and then scroll down to the DNS addresses. Write them down and move on to the next step.

Fourth: Open up your router page (if it isn't already). On your router's setup page under the Basic Setup screen look for the section called Internet Setup. From here you need to

a) Change the connection type to a static IP, then

b) scroll down and find the Network AddressServer Settings
under the network settings heading. Click the disable button beside DHCP.

c) Scroll down and click save, and then continue.

Fifth: Now you should be back to the Setup-Basic Setup page, and your changes should have taken effect. At this point you want to get to the properties window for your connection. There are several ways to do this, so if you're one of the people who know them, feel special. For those of you who are still getting over the fact that a mouse isn't just a furry rodent,

a)click on Start->Control Panel->Network Connections. Then

b)click on either Local Area Connection (if you’re the router) or Wireless Network Connection (if you're the wireless).

c)Click on the Properties button on the screen that comes up. This will bring up another screen. Here

d) click on Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and click on the Properties button.

e)Click the buttons for "Use the following IP address" and "Use the following DNS server addresses" then enter the info from the cmd window into the appropriate places.

f)I don't know how much of a difference having a third DNS address makes, but if you want it for whatever reason, after you've entered in the other two DNS addresses click the Advanced button, then the DNS tab, and click the add button. Enter your address, and click ok/apply on all the windows that've come up since step d). When you get to the window that has the properties for your connection, click Close -not- Cancel. It'll take a second for all the settings to take effect, so sit tight. Eventually the window will close, and you're done. Cheers!




good help on WRT54G but... When go to enter the "Alternet DNS" I dont see any in the list from ipconfig/all

??


Top
  
 
PostPosted: Fri Dec 31, 2004 8:59 pm 
bajaflats wrote:




good help on WRT54G but... When go to enter the "Alternet DNS" I dont see any in the list from ipconfig/all

??[/quote]


I just see ....

fec0:0:0:ffff::1%1
fec0:0:0:ffff::1%1
fec0:0:0:ffff::1%1


what is that?


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Mar 18, 2005 10:38 am 
Guys I can't find out what is my router because I'm using a laptop and I can't possibly break it open.Is there any other ways to check it??


Top
  
 
 Post subject: Still Yellow... but
PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2005 3:10 pm 
I tried the reconfiguration of the same router type, and the result:
Yellow light
Cable Modem connection died.
Internet access died.

I had to reset the router as well as my computers connection and reboot to default for my connection back. something wrong with the router or something?


-getting pissed because router slashed my up/dl by a good 90%


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jun 17, 2005 8:36 pm 
hey im am confuse do i have to setup static ip in the internet connection in the router if i do that i wont be able to connect since i connect using PPPoe. But i did set my tcp/ip option.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2005 3:47 am 
You may not have to setup a static IP.

Normally, your router rejects all incoming connections. It has no idea which PC they should go to, so it just drops anything that isn't a response to something that one of your PC's requested.

Port forwarding is setting up the router so that incoming connections on a certain port get forwarded to a certain PC. For example, setting up port forwarding for port 12345 to go to IP address 192.168.0.111 tells your router that any incoming connection on port 12345 should get passed on to the PC at 192.16810.111.

Port forwarding associates a certain port number(s) with a certain IP address. In order for this to work all the time, your PC has to have the same IP address. If it changes, then the port will no longer be forwarded to your PC (it'll get sent to whatever device got that IP).

Routers usually default to using DHCP. The PC asks the router for config info, and the router automatically gives it an IP address to use. This is great, but it's possible to get a different IP address next time your PC asks.

There are two ways to make sure that your PC gets the same IP address all the time. The first way is to use reserved DHCP. This is something in the router. You tell it that a certain MAC address (network card's electronic serial number) should always get the same IP. This is the best solution. It works automatically, like regular DHCP, but the router always gives you the same IP address.

The second way, which is the only way if your router doesn't support reserved DHCP, is to manually set your computer's IP address. The best way to do this is to let your PC connect with DHCP so that everything gets set up automatically. Note all those settings, and re-enter the same info manually. You're specifically telling your PC that it has a certain IP address, so it doesn't matter what else the router does or doesn't say. If you do this, you need to make sure you give your PC an IP address outside the DHCP range. Otherwise, the router could use DHCP to give the same IP address to another computer too. Two computers with the same address will obviously cause lots of problems.

Reserved DHCP is better than manually setting an IP for several reasons. Everything is configured in the router - you don't have to check 4 different PCs to make sure they're all right. Reserved DHCP lets you have a static IP, but retain the automatic configuration - less work for the user, and less chance to make a mistake. Reserved DHCP also means that you just leave your PC set to automatically get an IP - if you hook it up to a different network, it will automatically work with that network too, without changing anything.

The only downside to reserved DHCP is really that it won't work if your DHCP server is down. However, Windows will now autoassign an IP address if the DHCP server is down, so that's not much of a problem. And if your router's down, you've probably got more on your mind than getting an IP address for your PC. Oh yeah, and the fact that quite a few of the "better" routers don't support reserved DHCP. The DLink DI604 I got for $20 over 5 years ago has it though...

See Tweaking your system to get the most out of BitTorrent for more details on NAT routers, port forwarding, etc.


Top
  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Forum locked This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 24 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Yahoo [Bot] and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group